Understanding Liquid Sclerotherapy

It might be unusual to think of irritation as a good thing, but if you’re unhappy with the appearance of varicose and spider veins, a little irritation is just what you need. If you haven’t heard of liquid sclerotherapy for treating varicose veins, it may be the solution you need to restore your legs to a smooth and even appearance.  

Choosing a phlebology practice like MD Vein & Skin Specialists is your best option for the right treatment of your varicose vein condition. Liquid sclerotherapy is just one of the options that may banish these unsightly blood vessels for good.

The background on varicose veins

Veins have a tough job to do, particularly in the lower part of your body, since they’re the route that gets blood back to your heart and lungs to recharge them with oxygen. This fight against gravity is aided by one-way valves in veins that prevent the backflow of blood.

The pumping of your heart is aided by muscle contractions that happen naturally with movement to work blood back to the heart. When the valves in your veins begin to fail, however, blood can move backwards, stretching veins, pooling  and creating the characteristic dark blue and bulging appearance of varicose veins. Their smaller cousins, spider veins, form in the same fashion, though they may be red in color.

Often, varicose veins are only a cosmetic issue, but over time and without treatment, you could develop painful complications.

Liquid sclerotherapy

Sclerotherapy describes a technique where an irritant is injected directly into an affected vein. The sclerotic substance causes scarring and blocking of the vein, and your body starts to reroute blood around the treated vein. Over time, this now useless vein collapses and your body starts to break it down and absorb it. The dark appearance of the vein fades and disappears.

Sclerotic agents come in a variety of forms. Liquids were once the primary injectables, breaking down the walls of the veins to start the reabsorption process, and these are still often the choice for small and medium-sized varicose and spider veins.

Foam sclerotic agents are better suited for larger varicose veins, since they cover more surface area. In some cases, larger veins may require an additional injection to fully break down.

What to expect from sclerotherapy

Though vein irritation is the principle behind sclerotherapy, the treatment itself is simple enough. Administered as an injection in the MD Vein & Skin Specialists office, sclerotherapy doesn’t need anesthesia and there’s no recovery time after treatment. You should notice treated veins fading within a week or two, reaching maximum effect in about a month.

Sclerotherapy may not be the best option for advanced cases of varicose veins, but there are several other options to address these. Making an appointment with Dr. Clement Banda and our team at MD Vein & Skin Specialists is the best way to ensure the right care for your legs. Call the office directly or use the online booking tool to schedule your consultation, then get ready for your new and improved legs. Book your session today

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